Sunday 28th August 2016 – From Ballycastle to Slemish Barn, c. 45 miles.

Slemish is a volcanic plug that you can see from the road about half way between Carnlough on the coast and Ballymena. Slemish Barn is a very comfy hostel nearby, specifically at a place called ‘The Sheddings’ on my map, tho’ the eponymous pub was closed. We set out from Ballycastle about 10am got to the coast road, and then turned off that on the Corrymela lane that goes closer to the coast and past the Corrymela community that was famous for its reconciliation work during the troubles. Coastal lanes are scattered with fuchsia, wild roses, honeysuckle and even, just occasioaly, Hebes.  The fuchsias show just how mild it is here, they are six feet and more tall. Then from Ballyvoy we went over the hills to Torr Head. A slightly lost cyclist on a super carbon bike, though with a creaky seat post, asked where Torr Head was  – tho’ we met him coming the other waya few miles before we reached Torr Head so he must have been very near! We then reached the National Trust village of Cushendun designed by Mr Williams-Ellis of Portmerion fame, which showed in the quaint windows and style of the village houses and, indeed, the Big House (not so big) – tho’ there’s no herbaceous borders or entry to the house. It’s a pity, Northern Ireland could do with more in the way of NT gardens. Perhaps it’s planned…

We pushed on over the next headland on a small lane, avoiding the main coast road and reached Cushendall. It has a great beach, where I swam in cold (no-one else was swimming), clear water, shallow for quite a way out (otherwise I guess it’d be even colder). Wonderful on a hot day. You can see Scotland while you are swimming – the Mull of Kintyre looms out of the haze about 12 miles away. Then we pushed on along the coast past Waterfoot, saw an old faery tree in the ruined church (tied about with votive objects – pretty odd ones, like a ‘new car’ air freshener). Then along the sea, the water lapping at the road, past high cliffs inland, hot sun, rocky shore. Then finally to Carnlough – a pretty seaside town, where I bought dulse (seaweed) and postcards. The dulse is a dark salty edible seaweed and it’s to be tried out with tonight’s pasta. A sort of salty slightly elastic, marine flavoured kale. Then up Ballyvaddy road, climbing up and up to eventually reach the hostel. Excellent – a musical (there’s a piano), comfy, spacious place. We were sad to see the local pub closed but tried the Halfway House about a mile along the road – evidently very lively on a Sunday evening but faced with rather ordinary beers we took a pack of Guinness Extra Stout back to the hostel. It was also getting dark.

Guy discussed Brexit with the hostess – since it seems all the Northern Irish have joint Irish citizenship Brexit won’t alter their own rights in relation to the EU but the recreation of borders and tariffs are not helpful, of course. I wonder if you can just apply the tarifs and so forth at the border on the British side – at the port – and have no additional tariffs in the entirety of Ireland? No doubt Merkel and Junkers would be down on that like a ton of eurocrats… [this seems quite likely actually - currently no passport or checks are carried out until you cross the sea back to England... so perhaps it'll stay like that]

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